Automation engineering

Automation engineering

umbc No Comments

This article does not cite any sources. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (November 2014) (Learn how and when to remove this template message)

Automation engineering has two different meanings:

From a software engineering point of view looking to automate software processes.
From a traditional engineering sense providing automated solutions to physical activities.

Contents

1 Automation engineer
2 Scope
3 Work and career after graduation
4 Job Description
5 Necessary skills
6 References

Automation engineer[edit]
Automation engineers are experts who have the knowledge and ability to design, create, develop and manage systems, for example, factory automation, process automation and warehouse automation.
Scope[edit]
Automation engineering is the integration of standard engineering fields.
Work and career after graduation[edit]
Graduates can work for both government and private sector entities such as industrial production, companies that create and use automation systems, for example paper industry, automotive industry or food and agricultural industry and water treatment.
Job Description[edit]
Automation engineers can design, program, simulate and test automated machinery and processes. Automation engineers usually are employed in industries such as car manufacturing or food processing plants and robots. Automation engineers are responsible for detailed design specifications and other documents in their creations.
Necessary skills[edit]
Automation engineers must have these qualities:
• Ability to solve problems.
• Creative thinking
• Ability to communicate well with other members of the development team
References[edit]

2015 WTA Elite Trophy – Doubles

umbc No Comments

Doubles

2015 WTA Elite Trophy

Champions
Liang Chen
Wang Yafan

Runners-up
Anabel Medina Garrigues
Arantxa Parra Santonja

Final score
6–4, 6–3

Events

Singles
Doubles

WTA Elite Trophy
· 2016 →

Main article: 2015 WTA Elite Trophy
This was the first edition of the event.
Liang Chen and Wang Yafan won the title, defeating Anabel Medina Garrigues and Arantxa Parra Santonja in the final, 6–4, 6–3.

Contents

1 Players
2 Draw

2.1 Key
2.2 Final
2.3 Group A
2.4 Group B

3 References

Players[edit]

Klaudia Jans-Ignacik / Andreja Klepač (Round robin)
Anabel Medina Garrigues / Arantxa Parra Santonja (Final)
Gabriela Dabrowski / Alicja Rosolska (Round robin)
Liang Chen / Wang Yafan (Champions)
Lyudmyla Kichenok / Nadiia Kichenok (Round robin)
Xu Shilin / You Xiaodi (Round robin)

Draw[edit]
Key[edit]

Q = Qualifier
WC = Wild Card
LL = Lucky Loser
Alt = Alternate
SE = Special Exempt
PR = Protected Ranking
w/o = Walkover
r = Retired
d = Defaulted

Final[edit]

 
Final

 
 
 
 
 
 

 
4/WC
  Liang Chen
  Wang Yafan
6
6

2
  Anabel Medina Garrigues
  Arantxa Parra Santonja
4
3

Group A[edit]

Jans-Ignacik
Klepač
Liang
Wang
Kichenok
Kichenok
RR W–L
Set W–L
Game W–L
Standings

1
Klaudia Jans-Ignacik
Andreja Klepač

6–7(6–8), 3–6
6–7(3–7), 1–6
0–2
0–4
16–26
3

4/WC
Liang Chen
Wang Yafan
7–6(8–6), 6–3

6–7(3–7), 6–4, [10–6]
2–0
4–1
26–20
1

5
Lyudmyla Kichenok
Nadiia Kichenok
7–6(7–3), 6–1
7–6(7–3), 4–6, [6–10]

1–1
3–2
24–20
2

Group B[edit]

Medina Garrigues
Parra Santonja
Dabrowski
Rosolska
Xu
You
RR W–L
Set W–L
Game W–L
Standings

2
Anabel Medina Garrigues
Arantxa Parra Santonja

6–3, 6–2
1–6, 6–3, [10–3]
2–0
4–1
20–14
1

3
Gabriela Dabrowski
Alicja Rosolska
3–6, 2–6

7–6(7–2), 4–6, [5–10]
0–2
1–4
16–25
3

6/WC
Xu Shilin
You Xiaodi
6–1, 3–6, [3–10]
6–7(2–7), 6–4, [10–5]

1–1
3–3
22–19
2

References[edit]

Doubles Draw

v
t
e

2015 WTA Tour
« 2014
2016 »

 
Grand Slam events

Australian Open (S, D, X)
French Open (S, D, X)
Wimbledon (S, D, X)
US Open (S, D, X)

 
WTA Premier Mandatory tournaments

Indian Wells (S, D)
Miami (S, D)
Madrid (S, D)
Beijing (S, D)

 
WTA Premier 5

Byron Kokkalanis

umbc No Comments

Byron Kokkalanis

Medal record

Men’s Sailing

Representing  Greece

Windsurfing World Championships

2013 Buzios,Brazil
RS:X

Windsurfing European Championships

2013 Brest,France
RS:X

2012 Madeira,Portugal
RS:X

2013 Burgas,Bulgaria
RS:X

2013 Sopot,Poland
RS:X

Byron Kokkalanis (Greek: Βύρων Κοκκαλάνης) (born 19 August 1985 in Athens) is a Greek windsurfer of partly Filipino ancestry. He started sailing in 1997 in the Mistral class and 3 years later he won the Mistral Junior World Championship, his first international regatta. He took the fifth place at the 2016 Summer Olympics and he was sixth at the 2012 London Olympic Games.
He was also fifth at the 2012 RS:X World Championships.,[1] third at the 2013 RS:X World Championship, first at the 2013 RS:X European Championship.[2]
References[edit]

^ [1]
^ [2]

External links[edit]

ISAF Profile
Official website

Adhemarius donysa

umbc No Comments

Adhemarius donysa

Scientific classification

Kingdom:
Animalia

Phylum:
Arthropoda

Class:
Insecta

Order:
Lepidoptera

Family:
Sphingidae

Genus:
Adhemarius

Species:
A. donysa

Binomial name

Adhemarius donysa
(Druce, 1889)

Synonyms

Ambulyx donysa Druce, 1889

Adhemarius donysa is a species of moth in the family Sphingidae. It was described by Druce in 1889,[1] and is known from Mexico.
Description[edit]

Dorsale male – MHNT

△ ventral male – MHNT

Dorsale female – MHNT

△ ventral female – MHNT

Biology[edit]
There are probably at least two generations per year.[2]
References[edit]

^ “Adhemarius donysa (Druce, 1889) sec CATE Sphingidae, 2009”. Cate-sphingidae.org. Retrieved 2011-10-26. [permanent dead link]
^ “Silkmoths”. Silkmoths.bizland.com. Archived from the original on 2012-10-11. Retrieved 2011-10-26. 

This Ambulycini-related article is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.

v
t
e

List of Latin place names in Asia

umbc No Comments

Latin Place Names

by country

Africa

Asia

Europe

Balkans
Britain
Continental and Ireland
Iberia
Italy and Malta

by type

Cities

Countries

Islands

Lakes

Mountains

Regions

Rivers

This list includes Asian countries and regions that were part of the Roman Empire, or that were given Latin place names in historical references.

Contents

1 Background
2 Caveats and notes
3 Cities and towns in Anatolia (Turkey)
4 Cities and towns in Afghanistan
5 Cities and towns in Cyprus
6 Cities and towns in Georgia
7 Cities and towns in Iran
8 Cities and towns in Iraq
9 Cities and towns in Israel
10 Cities and towns in Lebanon
11 Cities and towns in Pakistan
12 Cities and towns in the Palestinian territories
13 Cities and towns in Russia
14 Cities and towns in Syria
15 Cities and towns in Tajikistan
16 Cities and towns in Turkmenistan
17 Cities and towns in Uzbekistan
18 See also
19 References
20 External links

Background[edit]
Until the Modern Era, Latin was the common language for scholarship and mapmaking. During the 19th and 20th centuries, German scholars in particular have made significant contributions to the study of historical place names, or Ortsnamenkunde. These studies have, in turn, contributed to the study of genealogy. For genealogists and historians of pre-Modern Europe, knowing alternate names of places is vital to extracting information from both public and private records. Even specialists in this field point out, however, that the information can be easily taken out of context, since there is a great deal of repetition of place names throughout Europe; reliance purely on apparent connections should therefore be tempered with valid historical methodology.
Caveats and notes[edit]
Latin place names are not always exclusive to one place — for example, there were several Roman cities whose names began with Colonia and then a more descriptive term. During the Middle Ages, these were often shortened to just Colonia. One of these, Colonia Agrippinensis, retains the name today in the form of Cologne.
Early sources for Roman names show numerous variants and spellings of the Latin names.
The modern canonical name is listed first. Sources are listed chronologically. In general, only the earliest source is shown for each name, although many of the names are recorded in more than one of the sources. Where the source differs in spelling, or has other alternatives, these are listed following the source. As an aid to searching, variants

1922–23 Svenska Serien

umbc No Comments

Svenska Serien 1922–23, part of the 1922–23 Swedish football season, was the ninth Svenska Serien season played. The league was divided into to regional divisions with AIK and GAIS winning the eastern and western divisions. GAIS won the competition after defeating AIK in a final play-off.

Contents

1 League tables

1.1 Östra
1.2 Västra
1.3 Championship play-offs
1.4 Relegation play-offs

2 References
3 Notes

League tables[edit]
Östra[edit]

Pos
Team
Pld
W
D
L
GF
GA
GAvg
Pts
Qualification or relegation

1
AIK !AIK (A)
10
7
1
2
28
17
+11
15
Championship Playoffs

2
IFK Eskilstuna !IFK Eskilstuna
10
4
2
4
21
17
+4
10

3
Hammarby IF !Hammarby IF
10
4
1
5
16
18
−2
9

4
Djurgårdens IF !Djurgårdens IF
10
3
3
4
16
9
+7
9

5
IK Sleipner !IK Sleipner
10
4
1
5
14
20
−6
9

6
IFK Norrköping !IFK Norrköping (O)
10
4
0
6
15
9
+6
8
Relegation Playoffs

Source:[citation needed]
Rules for classification: 1) points; 2) goal average
(C) = Champion; (R) = Relegated; (P) = Promoted; (E) = Eliminated; (O) = Play-off winner; (A) = Advances to a further round.
Only applicable when the season is not finished:
(Q) = Qualified to the phase of tournament indicated; (TQ) = Qualified to tournament, but not yet to the particular phase indicated; (RQ) = Qualified to the relegation tournament indicated; (DQ) = Disqualified from tournament.
Västra[edit]

Pos
Team
Pld
W
D
L
GF
GA
GAvg
Pts
Qualification or relegation

1
GAIS !GAIS (A)
10
5
3
2
15
10
+5
13
Championship Playoffs

2
IFK Göteborg !IFK Göteborg
10
5
3
2
18
9
+9
13

3
Örgryte IS !Örgryte IS
10
5
2
3
17
9
+8
12

4
Hälsingborgs IF !Hälsingborgs IF
10
4
4
2
14
9
+5
12

5
IFK Malmö !IFK Malmö
10
3
1
6
8
22
−14
7

6
Malmö FF !Malmö FF (R)
10
1
2
7
6
19
−13
4
Relegation Playoffs

Source:[citation needed]
Rules for classification: 1) points; 2) goal average
(C) = Champion; (R) = Relegated; (P) = Promoted; (E) = Eliminated; (O) = Play-off winner; (A) = Advances to a further round.
Only applicable when the season is not finished:
(Q) = Qualified to the phase of tournament indicated; (TQ) = Qualified to tournament, but not yet to the particular phase indicated; (RQ) = Qualified to the relegation tournament indicated; (DQ) = Disqualified from tournament.
Championship play-offs[edit]

GAIS v AIK

June 17, 1923

GAIS
3–1
AIK

?, Gothenburg

AIK v GAIS

July 8, 1923

AIK
0–2
GAIS

?, Stockholm

Relegation play-offs[edit]

Väster

Kallurkot

umbc No Comments

Kallurkot
کلورکوٹ

City

Kallurkot

Coordinates: 32°47′12″N 71°06′26″E / 32.78667°N 71.10722°E / 32.78667; 71.10722Coordinates: 32°47′12″N 71°06′26″E / 32.78667°N 71.10722°E / 32.78667; 71.10722

Pakistan
 Pakistan

Province
Punjab

Elevation
1,487 m (4,879 ft)

Time zone
PST (UTC+5)

30110
30140

Number of Union councils
1

Website
http://tmakalurkot.com/History.html

Kallurkot (Urdu: کلورکوٹ‎), is a town in Bhakkar District in the Punjab Province of Pakistan.
The town is the headquarters of Kaloorkot Tehsil.[1] The town of Kallurkot is itself a Union councils.[1] During British rule the railway station at Kallurkot was built as part of the North-Western Railway route.[2]
Kallur Kot is situated at distance of 60 Kilometers to the north of Bhakkar on the main railway line to Mianwali on the eastern ban of river Indus. There are live stock farm Ghulaman. Kallur Kot. Semen Production and Fareeda Garden at Kallur Kot. Likewise other district Tehsil has extreme climate. The maximum temperature goes up to 42°C and minimum to 28°C. The hottest months are June, July and August. Winter is equally cold and frosty with maximum at -10°C.
The Indus, by the times passes from Kallur Kot tehsil to Bhakkar Tehsil loses much of the velocity with which the water rushed from the gorge at Tehsil Kallur Koy and throughout the Bhakkar Tehsil confines itself to more or less defined course.
Languages[edit]
Thalochi and Shapuri dialects of Punjabi are the main languages of people. Urdu is spoken by the majority of people In Kallurkot.
Demography[edit]
Kallurkot is now a Tehsil of District Bhakkar, with population of more than 30000.
References[edit]

^ a b Tehsils & Unions in the District of Bhakkar – Government of Pakistan
^ “Imperial Gazetteer2 of India, Volume 11, page 266 — Imperial Gazetteer of India — Digital South Asia Library — Dera Ismail Khān District”. dsal.uchicago.edu. Retrieved 2016-03-24. 

Charles Lee (American football)

umbc No Comments

Charles Lee

No. 82, 81

Position:
Wide receiver

Personal information

Date of birth:
(1977-11-19) November 19, 1977 (age 39)

Career information

College:
Central Florida

NFL Draft:
2000 / Round: 7 / Pick: 242

Career history

Green Bay Packers (2000–2001)
Tampa Bay Buccaneers (2002–2004)
Arizona Cardinals (2005)
Orlando Predators (2007)

Career highlights and awards

2003 Super Bowl Champ

Career NFL statistics

Receptions:
72

Receiving yards:
957

Touchdowns:
3

Career Arena statistics

Receptions:
10

Receiving yards:
113

Touchdowns:
1

Player stats at PFR

Player stats at ArenaFan.com

Charles Lee (born November 19, 1977 in Miami, Florida) is a former American football wide receiver in the National Football League. He has played for the Green Bay Packers, the Tampa Bay Buccaneers and the Arizona Cardinals. Lee was a member of the Tampa Bay Buccaneers’ 2003 Super Bowl winning team. Already on probation for cocaine possession, he was arrested on December 5, 2007, for robbing two students near the University of Central Florida, the college where he formerly starred.[1] He was sentenced to five years in prison, and plans to finish college in jail.[1] Lee is a member of Kappa Alpha Psi fraternity.
References[edit]

^ a b Former UCF Football Star Sentenced To 5 Years For Armed Robbery – News Story – WFTV Orlando Archived May 3, 2008, at the Wayback Machine.

v
t
e

Green Bay Packers 2000 NFL draft selections

Bubba Franks
Chad Clifton
Steve Warren
Na’il Diggs
Anthony Lucas
Gary Berry
Kabeer Gbaja-Biamila
Joey Jamison
Mark Tauscher
Ron Moore
Charles Lee
Eugene McCaslin
Rondell Mealey

v
t
e

Tampa Bay Buccaneers Super Bowl XXXVII champions

7 Martín Gramática
9 Tom Tupa
10 Shaun King
11 Rob Johnson
14 Brad Johnson
19 Keyshawn Johnson
20 Ronde Barber
23 Jermaine Phillips
25 Brian Kelly
26 Dwight Smith
27 Aaron Stecker
30 Darian Barnes
31 Tim Wansley
32 Michael Pittman
34 Dexter Jackson (MVP)
35 Corey Ivy
36 Travis Stephens
38 John Howell
40 Mike Alstott
41 Daniel Wilcox
43 Jameel Cook
45 Mike Solwold
47 John Lynch
51 Alshermond Singleton
52 Nate Webster
53 Shelton Quarles
54 Idri

Dulwich OnView

umbc No Comments

A gathering of writers and photographers who have contributed to the community blog, Dulwich OnView (2008).

Dulwich Picture Gallery, with which Dulwich OnView is associated.

Dulwich OnView is a museum-based virtual community associated with the Dulwich Picture Gallery for the local community, based in the suburb of Dulwich, southeast London, England.[1][2][3] It runs a blog-based online magazine concerned with people and culture in Dulwich and the surrounding area.[4]
The group was formed through the Friends of Dulwich Picture Gallery in a grassroots manner.[5] and is supported by the Gallery.[6] It uses a combination of Web 2.0 technologies as needed, using facilities such as a Facebook group for the film society of the Friends of the Dulwich Picture Gallery,[7] Flickr for photographs taken by the local community,[8] a magazine blog on WordPress,[9] “tweets” on Twitter,[10] etc., to support its activities. The group is entirely run by volunteers.[3] The editorial team for the main website is led by Ingrid Beazley and Shapa Begum.
In 2010, the web interface was updated with multiple sections and a new style.[11][12] Shortly afterwards, the site won the Museums and the Web Best of the Web award in the “best small site” category.[13][14]
In 2012, Dulwich OnView included articles in the graffiti artist Stik after he produced works in Dulwich,[15] also featured by Dulwich Picture Gallery.[16] In 2013, Dulwich OnView reported on the Dulwich Street Art Festival showcasing street art based on traditional artworks in Dulwich Picture Gallery, forming Dulwich Outdoor Gallery.[17]
References[edit]

^ Beazley, Ingrid, Reach new audiences, increase numbers of visitors, and become a major part of the local community by using online social networking sites and blogs. In David Bearman and Jennifer Trant (editors), MW2008: Museums and the Web 2008, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, 9–12 April 2008. Toronto: Archives & Museum Informatics.
^ Beazley, Ingrid, Social Media and Museums — A Report from Ingrid in Montreal, Dulwich OnView, 15 April 2008.
^ a b Who We Are, Dulwich OnView.
^ Ooi, Yang-May, Patrons of Dulwich Picture Gallery, Fusion View, 31 March 2009.
^ Friends of the Gallery, Dulwich Picture Gallery.
^ In View & Dulwich OnView, Dulwich Picture Gallery.
^ GalleryFilm at Dulwich Picture Gallery, Facebook.
^ Dulwich Picture Gallery flickr Friends, Flickr.
^ Blogs about: Dulwich Onview, WordPress.
^ dulwichonview, Twitter.
^ Liu, Alison H.Y., McDaid,

Jeanne Robertson

umbc No Comments

Jeanne Robertson

Beauty pageant titleholder

Performing onstage in Charlottesville, Virginia, April 2012

Born
September 21, 1943

Occupation
Humorist, speaker, teacher

Height
6 ft 2 in (1.88 m)

Hair color
White[1] (formerly blond)[2]

Title(s)
Miss North Carolina 1963

Major
competition(s)
Miss America 1964

Spouse
Jerry Robertson, Ph.D.

Official website

Jeanne Swanner Robertson (born September 21, 1943) is an American humorist, motivational speaker[2] and a former Miss North Carolina and physical education teacher.

Contents

1 Early life
2 Pageant participant
3 Career
4 Honors and awards
5 Personal life
6 Books
7 Audio and video media
8 References
9 External links

Early life[edit]
Jeanne Swanner was raised in Graham, North Carolina,[3][2] one of three daughters. Not only was she taller than sisters Katherine and Andrea,[4] she also especially tall as a youth, growing to 6 ft 2 in (1.88 m) by age thirteen and in seventh grade.[4] She was an avid basketball player.[2]
Pageant participant[edit]
In 1963, at age 19, she was named Miss North Carolina[5] and went on to be named Miss Congeniality in that year’s Miss America competition.[6][2] Robertson credits her reign as the catalyst for her career.[7][8]
Following her Miss North Carolina reign, Robertson used the scholarship funds to fund her college education at Auburn University where she majored in physical education and played on its basketball team,[2] graduating in 1967.[9]
Career[edit]
Robertson taught physical education for eight years in North Carolina.[10]
Although she began her public speaking career with her pageant title, Robertson has achieved much more national attention as a humorist and speaker. Her anecdotes have been broadcast regularly on satellite radio comedy channels including XM Radio’s Laugh USA, Sirius Radio’s Blue Collar Comedy and its Family Comedy Channel,[9][2] and Laugh Break. Her popularity soared, however, in 2009 after a handful of humorous clips from her talks became viral videos.[8][2] Robertson distinguishes between a humorist, which she considers herself, and a comedian, stating, “The humorist weaves the longer stories with a point. We don’t go ‘after’ anybody. I’m telling my life.”[6]
In 1980 she was designated a Certified Speaking Professional by the National Speakers Association (NSA), and served as the association’s president in 1985.[9] She is also an award-winning Toastmaster.[2]
On April 29, 2008, she spoke at